Has Syria weathered the storm?

Hassan NasrallahBashar al-Assad and 
Mahmoud Ahmadinejad
Al Musketeers

tehrantimes.com
Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s speech last week at Damascus University is viewed by political analysts as a milestone in the country’s 10-month crisis. Assad’s decision to speak to the media proves he understands the gravity of the situation.

During the address, he clarified various dimensions of the external interference and its impact on security on the ground. 

Showing no sign he is ready to yield to the pressure imposed on his government, the 46-year-old president tried to exude an air of confidence in the face of the numerous conspiracies financed by outsiders. This display of confidence in the Syrian government’s ability to control the internal crisis was in fact the main distinction between the recent speech and the previous stances adopted by the president.

Nearly 10 months since the crisis began in Syria, the speech was an attempt to prove that the country has weathered the worst of the storm and that the efforts of the external powers, mainly the United States and its regional Arab proxies, to topple the Syrian government have been thwarted. The veto of the draft UN Security Council resolution on Syria by Russia and China and Russia’s decision to send an aircraft carrier and four other warships to the Mediterranean Sea as naval support for Damascus have clearly boosted Assad’s confidence in dealing with the Western plots.  

The explicit language used in Assad’s speech was a message to his opponents in Syria meant to convince them to cooperate with the government in its reform plan. It was also an attempt to show the world the government’s might.

However, Assad’s show of confidence does not mean that Syria has completely emerged from the crisis and returned to stability. We should wait to see how serious the government is about implementing its reform plans and what will happen at the upcoming Baath Party meeting. 

The national referendum in March and the parliamentary election in June are other important factors that will also have an influence on the efforts to establish stability in Syria.

Mohammad Irani formerly served as Iran’s ambassador to Jordan and Lebanon and is an expert in Middle Eastern studies based in Tehran.
Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s speech last week at Damascus University is viewed by political analysts as a milestone in the country’s 10-month crisis. Assad’s decision to speak to the media proves he understands the gravity of the situation.

During the address, he clarified various dimensions of the external interference and its impact on security on the ground. 

Showing no sign he is ready to yield to the pressure imposed on his government, the 46-year-old president tried to exude an air of confidence in the face of the numerous conspiracies financed by outsiders. This display of confidence in the Syrian government’s ability to control the internal crisis was in fact the main distinction between the recent speech and the previous stances adopted by the president.

Nearly 10 months since the crisis began in Syria, the speech was an attempt to prove that the country has weathered the worst of the storm and that the efforts of the external powers, mainly the United States and its regional Arab proxies, to topple the Syrian government have been thwarted. The veto of the draft UN Security Council resolution on Syria by Russia and China and Russia’s decision to send an aircraft carrier and four other warships to the Mediterranean Sea as naval support for Damascus have clearly boosted Assad’s confidence in dealing with the Western plots.  

The explicit language used in Assad’s speech was a message to his opponents in Syria meant to convince them to cooperate with the government in its reform plan. It was also an attempt to show the world the government’s might.

However, Assad’s show of confidence does not mean that Syria has completely emerged from the crisis and returned to stability. We should wait to see how serious the government is about implementing its reform plans and what will happen at the upcoming Baath Party meeting. 

The national referendum in March and the parliamentary election in June are other important factors that will also have an influence on the efforts to establish stability in Syria.

Mohammad Irani formerly served as Iran’s ambassador to Jordan and Lebanon and is an expert in Middle Eastern studies based in Tehran.
Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s speech last week at Damascus University is viewed by political analysts as a milestone in the country’s 10-month crisis. Assad’s decision to speak to the media proves he understands the gravity of the situation.

During the address, he clarified various dimensions of the external interference and its impact on security on the ground.

Showing no sign he is ready to yield to the pressure imposed on his government, the 46-year-old president tried to exude an air of confidence in the face of the numerous conspiracies financed by outsiders. This display of confidence in the Syrian government’s ability to control the internal crisis was in fact the main distinction between the recent speech and the previous stances adopted by the president.

Nearly 10 months since the crisis began in Syria, the speech was an attempt to prove that the country has weathered the worst of the storm and that the efforts of the external powers, mainly the United States and its regional Arab proxies, to topple the Syrian government have been thwarted. The veto of the draft UN Security Council resolution on Syria by Russia and China and Russia’s decision to send an aircraft carrier and four other warships to the Mediterranean Sea as naval support for Damascus have clearly boosted Assad’s confidence in dealing with the Western plots.

The explicit language used in Assad’s speech was a message to his opponents in Syria meant to convince them to cooperate with the government in its reform plan. It was also an attempt to show the world the government’s might.

However, Assad’s show of confidence does not mean that Syria has completely emerged from the crisis and returned to stability. We should wait to see how serious the government is about implementing its reform plans and what will happen at the upcoming Baath Party meeting.

The national referendum in March and the parliamentary election in June are other important factors that will also have an influence on the efforts to establish stability in Syria.

Mohammad Irani formerly served as Iran’s ambassador to Jordan and Lebanon and is an expert in Middle Eastern studies based in Tehran.

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