Israel tried to silence Flotilla victims



presstv
A Turkish lawyer for the victims and the relatives of the victims of Israel’s 2010 assault on Mavi Marmara, the Turkish vessel, which was leading a Gaza-bound humanitarian fleet, says Tel Aviv had made a secret offer to silence his clients, Press TV reports.

On Thursday, Ramazan Ariturk, one of the lawyers representing 465 victims and victims’ relatives, revealed Israel’s proposal to pay his clients a lump sum of USD six million (American taxpayer$).

He said the Israeli regime had made the offer to him through an intermediary foreign ambassador in Ankara just over a month ago.

He said the money would have been paid to a Jewish foundation in Turkey for distribution followed by an “apology” from Tel Aviv in order to settle lawsuits against the Israeli military.

Ariturk said he had told the unnamed ambassador that he would not accept the offer as it was not moral.

The lawyer added that he had informed the Turkish Foreign Ministry of Israel’s proposal and his rejection, adding that officials with the ministry said his decision had been appropriate and thanked him for the refusal.

On May 31, 2010, Israeli forces attacked the humanitarian Freedom Flotilla in international waters in the Mediterranean Sea, killing nine Turkish nationals and injuring about 50 other activists, who were part of the six-ship convoy.

A Turkish national, Suleyman Soylemez, who was injured during the attack, is still in coma, according to Turkish media.

A Tel Aviv-imposed siege has been depriving 1.6 million Palestinians in the Gaza Strip of food, fuel, medicine, and other necessities since mid-June 2007.



The report reveals that Dogan, the 19-year-old US citizen of Turkish descent, was filming with a small video camera on the top deck of the Mavi Marmara when he was shot twice in the head, once in the back and in the left leg and foot and that he was shot in the face at point blank range while lying on the ground.
The report says Dogan had apparently been "lying on the deck in a conscious or semi-conscious, state for some time" before being shot in his face.

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